ICanHazDatascience

Data Science is a Process [DS4B Session 1c]

People often ask me how they can become a data scientist. To which my answers are usually ‘why’, ‘what do you want to do with it’ and ‘let’s talk about what it really is’.  So let’s talk about what it really is.  There are many definitions of data science, e.g.: “A data scientist… excels at analyzing data, particularly large amounts of data, to help a business gain a competitive edge.” “The analysis of data using the scientific method” “A data scientist is an individual, organization or application that performs statistical analysis, data mining and retrieval processes on a large amount of data to identify trends, figures and other relevant information.” We can spend hours debating which definition is ‘right’, or we could spend those hours looking at what data scientists do in practice, getting some tools and techniques under our belts and finding a definition that works for each one of us personally….

ICanHazDatascience

About these sessions [DS4B Session 1b]

First, there are no prerequisites for these sessions except a curiosity to learn about data science and willingness to play with data. Second, the labs are designed to cover most of what you need to talk to data scientists, to specify your project, and to start exploring data science on your own.  They’re specifically aimed at the types of issues that you’ll see in the messy strange world of development, humanitarian and social data, and use tools that are free, well-supported and available offline. This may not be what you need, and that’s fine. If you want to learn about machine learning in depth, or create beautiful Python code, there are many courses for that (and the Data Science Communities and Courses page has a list of places you might want to start at).  But if you’re looking at social data, and to quote one of my students “can see the data…

ICanHazDatascience

DS4B: The Course [DS4B Session 1a]

[Cross-posted from LinkedIn] I’ve designed and taught 4 university courses in the past 3 years: ICT for development and social change (DSC, with Eric from BlueRidge), coding for DSC, data science coding for DSC and data science for DSC (with Stefan from Sumall).  The overarching theme of each of them was better access and understanding of technical tools for people who work in areas where internet is unavailable or unreliable, and where proprietary tools are prohibitively expensive. The tagline for the non-coding courses was the “anti-bullsh*t courses”: a place where students could learn what words like ‘Drupal’ and ‘classifier’ mean before they’re trying to assess a technical proposal with those words in, but also a place to learn how to interact with data scientists and development teams, to learn their processes, language and needs, and ask the ‘dumb questions’ (even though there are no dumb questions) in a safe space. Throw a rock on the…